Use the links below to learn about work related to the Land Bank and its efforts.

Beyond Blight

The City of Flint and the Genesee County Land Bank released Beyond Blight 2022, which provides direction for eliminating blight in Flint. Watch the video here for an overview or click here for the document.

Center for Community Progress

111 E. Court Street, Suite 2C-1, Flint, Michigan 48502
Phone: 877-542-4842 Fax: 810-233-7381

City of Flint Master Plan

The City of Flint is working on its first Master Plan since the 1960’s and we want you, the community, to tell us how the city should change and develop over the next 20 years. Imagine Flint is your opportunity to help shape the future of your city.

City of Flint Office of Blight Elimination & Neighborhood Stablization

The Office of Blight Elimination & Neighborhood Stabilization welcomes help from community members and community organizations to keep our neighborhoods beautiful! We work with partner organizations including the Neighborhood Engagement Hub and Keep Genesee County Beautiful to offer assistance  — all at no cost to you. Please call us at (810) 237-2090 at least two weeks prior to your cleanup.

City of Flint Parcel/Real Property Lookup

Search the City of Flint Assessor's Property Information

Genesee County Property Lookup

Ownership information for all properties in Genesee County

Genesee County Register of Deeds

Use this link to search for deeds, land contracts, judgements, etc.

Genesee County Treasurer Property Information

Use this link to see Assessment and Tax Information as well as Deliquent Taxes for property in Genesee County

Local Initiative Support Corporation
The Neighborhood Engagement Hub

3216 Martin Luther King Avenue. Flint, MI 48505

Phone: (810) 214-4829 Email: info@nehflint.org

Vacant Property Now & Tomorrow: Building Enduring Values with Natural Assests

“The community-design and property-management concepts that we developed for Flint and Genesee County apply to many communities in Michigan and across the country where the economy or weather events have led to massive property vacancies and dilapidated infrastructure,” said Nassauer, a noted expert on ecological design of metropolitan landscapes. “Sound science that invites community engagement is the basis for our approach. It protects natural resources, especially vulnerable water resources and habitats, for the future at the same time as it encourages community care now.”


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